Monthly Archives: September 2006

Camera Raw 3.5 now available

Adobe Camera Raw 3.5 has been released for Mac and Windows. Newly supported cameras:

  • Kodak EasyShare P712
  • Nikon D2Xs
  • Panasonic DMC-FZ50
  • Panasonic DMC-L1
  • Sony A100

A couple of notes:

  1. The DNG Converter is now available as a universal binary for Intel-based Macintosh hardware.
  2. The new camera support added to Adobe Camera Raw 3.5 is not officially available in Adobe Lightroom beta 3.
  3. The Nikon D80, Canon 400D/Rebel XTi., and other new cameras were introduced too recently to make the cut for this release, but we’re speeding up the development of ACR 3.6 to accommodate these new models.

As always, please take a second to ensure that you install the plug-in into the correct spot:
Mac: /Library/Application Support/Adobe/Plug-ins/CS2/File Formats/…
Win: \Program Files\Common Files\Adobe\Plug-ins\CS2\File Formats\…
The full list of 130 or so supported cameras is on the Camera Raw product page.

9/11 and photo manipulation: No Photoshop needed

Last month the world debated the integrity of photography in an era of easy digital manipulation. This month, attention turns to the interpretations we (photographers, viewers, writers) attach to images.
Magnum photographer Thomas Hoepker recently published a photo of young New Yorkers appearing to chat and relax while Ground Zero burned across the river behind them. Columnist Frank Rich saw in the image a symbol of American denial, disbelief, and demand to move on. Hoepker replied, adding context and asking some searching questions (“How would I have looked on that day to a distanced observer? Probably like a coldhearted reporter, geared to shoot the pictures of his life”). And the couple on the wall responded, hotly denying any lack of seriousness. [Via]
So many kinds of truth here…
What if the people in the photo had been caught sharing a smile while New York smoldered in the background? Well? In the city that Friday, my friends and I went out for beers near a lifeless Times Square; on the weekend we shopped for a new PC. Was that all wrong? You could give money, blood–but what the hell else could you do? If the folks in the photo were cracking the tension, I don’t think I can condemn them.
And what about the claim that the subjects represent something fundamental about America–a shortness of attention, a need to escape from tragedy? In the summer before 9/11, the country obsessed over shark attacks, pop stars, and missing white women on cable news. Now it’s stingray attacks, pop stars, and missing white women on cable news. Do the particulars of the conversation in that photo, whether serious or trivial, determine whether the photo is emblematic of something deep and troubling about our culture? You tell me.
For me the conversation throws the debate over digital manipulation into greater perspective: the battle for truth is fought on many fronts, and compared to the questions over what meaning can and should be assigned to images, the technical side starts to look straightforward. The bits matter, but we see in them what we want and need to see.
Related: Slate hosts a gripping and well produced Magnum Photos essay on 9/11. Susan Meiselas talks about seeing teams of doctors rushing around, slowly realizing how little they could do.
[Update: See also this daguerreotype of 9/11. [Via]

Sweet sassy molassey, that's some big glass!

Maybe the photography gods are trying to tell me to suck it up & buy a decent zoom lens already: after looking at this 1700mm f/4 monstrosity from Carl Zeiss, a 70-200 f/2.8 looks positively svelte. “Developed for long distance wildlife photography,” says Zeiss, this 563lb (!!) warhammer ain’t playin’. As my boss Kevin said, “You don’t lug that thing around; you put an engine on it and drive it home!” [Via Chris Quartetti]
[Update: As Bryan notes below, the side of the lens contains what appears to be Arabic script. Folks at T.O.P. offer more detail & comments.]

Photoshop 9.0.2 update available for Mac & Win

The Photoshop 9.0.2 update is now available for Mac OS X, along with the previously posted Windows update. (Both were initially posted together, but we found that a printing change made for OS 10.4 broke something on 10.3. That’s now been addressed, but if you are running a pre-10.4 system and already applied the earlier 9.0.2 update and have encountered a printing crash, you’ll want to reinstall CS2, then apply the new 9.0.2 update. Sorry for the lameness.)
9.0.2 is a small update, and fixes included in the Mac side include these:

  • Photoshop no longer crashes when encountering unsupported file types through the Acrobat Touchup workflow.
  • Supported files that incorrectly produced an “unsupported color space” message now open as expected.
  • TIFF files with layer data greater than 2GB now open correctly.
  • A printing issue that could cause banding when using inkjet printers with Mac OS X v.10.4 has been resolved.

Photoshop 9.0.2 update available for Mac & Win

The Photoshop 9.0.2 update is now available for Mac OS X, along with the previously posted Windows update. (Both were initially posted together, but we found that a printing change made for OS 10.4 broke something on 10.3. That’s now been addressed, but if you are running a pre-10.4 system and already applied the earlier 9.0.2 update and have encountered a printing crash, you’ll want to reinstall CS2, then apply the new 9.0.2 update. Sorry for the lameness.)
9.0.2 is a small update, and fixes included in the Mac side include these:

  • Photoshop no longer crashes when encountering unsupported file types through the Acrobat Touchup workflow.
  • Supported files that incorrectly produced an “unsupported color space” message now open as expected.
  • TIFF files with layer data greater than 2GB now open correctly.
  • A printing issue that could cause banding when using inkjet printers with Mac OS X v.10.4 has been resolved.

Lightroom Podcast #21: Nevada Wier

“I’m looking to expand a photographic vision, beyond the obvious, into the edge of light, into the edge of seeing, in a way into the edge of my imagination. Because intuition and imagination are such a big part of photography,” says photographer Nevada Wier in her conversation with George Jardine. George writes,

This podcast was recorded on Friday May 5th 2006, at the Santa Fe Workshop. Adobe Lightroom’s Pro Photography Evangelist George Jardine speaks with travel photographer Nevada Wier about how she got started traveling and photographing in exotic locations. Nevada discusses in depth, the patience, waiting and effort that’s often required to capture photos that “are all mine”, as well as camera techniques that create “more complicated images that give a sense of the place”.

This enhanced podcast includes photos taken by Nevada, and they can be viewed on Photo and Video iPods. Only the audio track will be heard on other devices.

The podcast is available as an MP3 file via George’s iDisk (under “0505-2 Podcast – Nevada Wier”). It’ll also be available via the Lightroom podcasts RSS feed, and by searching for “Lightroom” in iTunes.

Tilt-Shifting Tragedy

Earlier this year, tilt-shift photography & its Photoshop-simulated cousin drew considerable attention. Both approaches can be used to provide a narrow depth of field, making large subjects (e.g. Vegas) seem small and toylike.
Now a pair of photographers have brought that technique to bear in portraits of tragedy. Fred R. Conrad’s image provides a different perspective on the pit at Ground Zero. I find the sense of miniature Fisher-Price innocence unsettling. Meanwhile David Burnett renders the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. (The latter shots are much more impactful viewed larger, in case you have a copy of the print edition handy.)
On a related note, illustrator John Mavroudis provides an rare glimpse behind the scenes of creating a New Yorker cover–in this case the 9/11/06 cover. [Via]

Sleek Photoshop->Flash integration sneak at Flashforward

I’m getting back to my Web roots here in Austin, and at today’s Flashforward keynote speech, Flash PM Mike Downey gave a sneak peek of the integration with Photoshop that’s planned for Flash 9. Aral Balkan’s great coverage of the keynote sums up the demo nicely:

One of the new features is importing Photoshop PSD files. Import -> Import to stage. There is precise control over every layer. [Mike] chooses a PSD file and you can see all the layers, layer groups, layer comps and you can make choices about each layer separately. The options include “Make text editable” (so that text imported from PSD files is editable in Flash). He selects a Folder. And asks everything in that folder to be made into a MovieClip and he gives it an instance name and sets its registration point (the crowd loves it – claps!). They’re also supporting layer modes — drop shadows, blurs, etc. — and converting them to the Flash format. [Via]

Mike also noted that Flash plans to replace its vintage JPEG compression code with the library used by ImageReady/Save for Web. Good stuff is afoot at the Cirle A!
By the way, if you’re importing PSDs into Flash today, you might want to check out this video tip from Myke Ninness. He touches on how to convert Photoshop drop shadows into native Flash equivalents.

Sleek Photoshop->Flash integration sneak at Flashforward

I’m getting back to my Web roots here in Austin, and at today’s Flashforward keynote speech, Flash PM Mike Downey gave a sneak peek of the integration with Photoshop that’s planned for Flash 9. Aral Balkan’s great coverage of the keynote sums up the demo nicely:

One of the new features is importing Photoshop PSD files. Import -> Import to stage. There is precise control over every layer. [Mike] chooses a PSD file and you can see all the layers, layer groups, layer comps and you can make choices about each layer separately. The options include “Make text editable” (so that text imported from PSD files is editable in Flash). He selects a Folder. And asks everything in that folder to be made into a MovieClip and he gives it an instance name and sets its registration point (the crowd loves it – claps!). They’re also supporting layer modes — drop shadows, blurs, etc. — and converting them to the Flash format. [Via]

Mike also noted that Flash plans to replace its vintage JPEG compression code with the library used by ImageReady/Save for Web. Good stuff is afoot at the Cirle A!
By the way, if you’re importing PSDs into Flash today, you might want to check out this video tip from Myke Ninness. He touches on how to convert Photoshop drop shadows into native Flash equivalents.

Lightroom Podcast #20: Michael Clark

“I’m a climber, and you kind of have to be to photograph the rock climbing, because you have to have the skills to get above the climber, to get in position with them, and to hang out with them
on these big walls so that you’re comfortable,” says photograph Michael Clark. George Jardine interviewed Michael earlier this year and writes,

This podcast was recorded on Friday May 5th 2006, at the Santa Fe Workshop. Adobe Lightroom’s Pro Photography Evangelist George Jardine speaks with extreme sports photographer Michael Clark. This enhanced podcast includes photographs from Michael Clark’s exciting portfolio of climbing, mountain biking, and other extreme sports. [Update: George notes that Michael’s photography has been featured in the the ASMP’s “Best Of” issue.]

This enhanced podcast includes photos taken by Michael, and they can be viewed on Photo and Video iPods. Only the audio track will be heard on other devices.

The podcast is available as an MP3 file via George’s iDisk (under “0505-1 Podcast – Michael Clark”). It’s also available via the Lightroom podcasts RSS feed, and by searching for “Lightroom” in iTunes.