Monthly Archives: March 2017

Animation: A world in color

I love the animals created for this piece for Sherwin-Williams:

“In 2009,” writes the team at Buck, “we were asked by our friends at McKinney to explore a world made of color, literally. The Sherwin colors themselves are the cast of their own story of infinite possibility, taking us places that spark our sense of curiosity, exploration, and expression.”

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[Vimeo] [Via]

Imagine Dragons + Adobe invite fans to cut their own music video

Here’s a cool contest to celebrate the 25th (25th!!) anniversary of Adobe Premiere Pro:

Download exclusive, uncut music video footage and work with Adobe Premiere Pro CC to create your own edit of the video for their new hit song “Believer.” Deadline is April 8th.

A panel of luminary judges… will select the ultimate winner of the $25,000 Grand Prize and bragging rights.

We’re also awarding bonus prizes of $1,000 each and a year-long subscription to Creative Cloud for four special categories: Fan Favorite, Most Unexpected, Best Young Creator, and Best Short Form. And one special bonus prize of $2,500, a year-long subscription to Creative Cloud and 25 Adobe Stock credits for the cut with the best use of supplied Adobe Stock clips.

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Opera’s concept for “the future of web browsing”

Hmm—I’m not entirely sure what to make of Opera Neon, but props to them for looking to shake up some largely staid interaction patterns. For example:

Opera Neon’s newly developed physics engine is set to breathe life back into the internet. Tabs and other objects respond to you like real objects; they have weight and move in a natural way when dragged, pushed, or even popped.

Cream floats to the top, and so do your favorite tabs; Opera Neon’s gravity system pulls your most used tabs to a prominent position on your Speed Dial.

Check out the quick tour:

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[YouTube]

Sony enables in-camera ND filters

Hmm, interesting—I honestly had no idea that Sony cameras could install apps, but in retrospect the idea seems blindingly obvious: Why not be able to modify your light-capturing computer like this? PetaPixel writes,

Actually, it’s more than a grad. When you open up the app, you get several options: Graduated ND, Reverse Graduated ND, Color Stripe, Blue Sky, Sunset, and two Custom options for setting up your own presets. The presets will capture preset exposure and white balance values, and if you pick Custom, you can adjust the location and feathering of each boundary, the effect above and below that boundary, and more!

[YouTube]

Legoify All The Things!!

Check out the rather brilliant-looking, Lego-compatible Nimuno Loops:

Imagine being able to build around corners, on curved surfaces, or even onto the sides of that sailing ship you’ve just spent hours building. You forgot to engineer a point of attachment for that sweet dinosaur-smashing cannon? No problem. Snip a length of Nimuno Loops, stick it on the hull, mount your cannon and be on yarr way.

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[YouTube] [Via Beth Allen]

Illustrator at 30: A fun look back

Lennon/McCartney
Chocolate/Peanut Butter
John/Marva

How lucky it was for the world that a brilliant graphics engineer (PostScript creator & Adobe co-founder John Warnock) married a graphic designer (Marva Warnock) who could provide constant input as this groundbreaking app took shape. Those were the days, when the app splash screen listed the whole team of four engineers who’d built it—one of whom was the CEO.

Watch the Illustrator story unfold, from its beginning as Adobe’s first software product, to its role in the digital publishing revolution, to becoming an essential tool for designers worldwide. Interviews include cofounder John Warnock, his wife Marva, artists and designers Ron Chan, Bert Monroy, Dylan Roscover and Jessica Hische.

It’s fun to see all these old friends celebrating an old friend. It takes me back to when I uploaded a copy of the VHS tape (hosted by John himself!) that shipped in the box with Illustrator 1.0:

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Photography: How the BBC filmed animals in total darkness for “Planet Earth II”

“Days of Miracles & Wonder,” part 9,287:

PetaPixel writes,

There’s no longer any need to disrupt the animals’ habits and habitat using artificial light; thanks to advances in camera sensors and non-visible spectrum capture, the BBC is shooting the kind of wildlife footage that was simply unimaginable in the 80s and 90s. […]

The Vox video dives into the challenges nature documentaries like Planet Earth used to have back in the days of film, and then advances rapidly through the decades until we reach the jaw-dropping footage shot for Planet Earth II using infrared technology, thermal imaging, and incredible low-light cameras like Sony’s famed A7s.

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[YouTube]