Category Archives: Lightroom

CTRL+Console: iPad control for Lightroom & Premiere Pro

Check out Jeff Chow’s (now funded) Kickstarter project:

What do you think? It’s great-looking, but I remain a bit skeptical about using touchscreens (which obviously lack the physical variation of a keyboard or dedicated hardware controller) in this way. If you’re a Photoshop user with an iPad, are you using Adobe Nav–and if not, why not? I suspect the problem is that one has to keep glancing over at a touch screen, whereas one can navigate a keyboard (or physical jog wheel, etc.) simply by feel. Yet the concept remains alluring, so I’m curious about others’ assessment.
[Via James Cox]

Lightroom 4.3 RC now available

The Lightroom 4.3 Release Candidate is now available, adding new support for a range of cameras and offering Retina support in the Develop module.

  • Canon PowerShot S110
  • Canon PowerShot G15
  • Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
  • Casio Exilim EX-ZR1000
  • Casio Exilim EX-FC300S
  • Nikon D600 *
  • Olympus PEN E-PL5
  • Olympus PEN E-PM2
  • Olympus STYLUS XZ-2 iHS
  • Panasonic DMC-GH3
  • Pentax K-5 II
  • Pentax K-5 IIs
  • Pentax Q10

Check out the Lightroom Journal entry for complete details.

VSCO Keys customizes Lightroom shortcuts

Visual Supply Co., makers of popular image adjustment presets for Lightroom, has announced VSCO Keys. According to the press release,

VSCO Keys™, a powerful keyboard shortcut tool created to drastically reduce image editing time in Adobe Lightroom 4 and Lightroom 3. Fully customizable, lightning fast and economically priced… Using the VSCO Keys online app, photographers can add, change or delete shortcut keys, or even save multiple keyboard configurations.

Teaser:

They note,

We’re not automating the mouse; you’ll notice sliders just move by themselves when you press a key. This allows us to access all tools and presets in Lightroom’s Develop Panel, not just what’s visible and clickable on the screen. It also enables the user to edit their photos in any mode or layout of Lightroom. You can even hide all the panels and it will still work… VSCO Keys is totally customizable through the online app, allowing you to assign any tool in the Develop Panel, any preset, and most Lightroom shortcuts to any key on the keyboard to suite your own needs.

Demo: 

VSCO Keys costs $79 (or $59.25 for users of other VSCO products).

A beautiful "Berlin Hyper-Lapse"

Shahab Gabriel Behzumi shot for six days, then produced this rather eye-popping piece.

He writes,

I had to import and customize the NEF files before I equalized them with the great LR-Timelapse from Gunther Wegner. (Adobe Lightroom is necessary) The observed JPEG had then to be droped into virtual dub and were rendered as AVI. When this was done, I had to stabilize the sequences manually frame by frame (AE motion tracker) and rendered each of them in 3 different sizes: (4928×3264 pixels, 1920×1080 pixels, 1024×768 pixels) Last but not least the snippets were edited fitting to the beautiful title “Diving Through The Blue” by the respectable composer and musician Valentin Boomes.


Demo: The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 4

Julieanne Kost writes,

In this episode of The Complete Picture (The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush), discover the power of making selective adjustments like dodging and burning, color corrections and noise removal using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

[Via Jeff Tranberry]

Engineers: Come build the future of Lightroom

Past is prelude, and these guys are up to some seriously interesting stuff. If you’re a talented engineer interested in working from Minnesota or San Jose, you can help the future arrive faster.

We are particularly interested in candidates with strong backgrounds in digital asset management, performance tuning, and building of well-crafted user interfaces. A passion for photography is a plus.

Check out the full listing. We hope to meet you soon.

Lightroom 4.2 release candidate adds camera support, fixes bugs

Lightroom 4.2  is now available as a Release Candidate  on Adobe Labs.   The “release candidate” label indicates that this update is well tested but would benefit from additional community testing before it is distributed automatically to all of our customers.

New cameras supported:

  • Canon EOS 650D / Rebel T4i
  • Canon EOS M
  • Fuji FinePix F800EXR
  • Leaf Credo 40
  • Leaf Credo 60
  • Panasonic DMC-FZ200
  • Panasonic DMC-G5
  • Panasonic DMC-LX7
  • Pentax K-30
  • Sony DSC-RX100

For a complete list of other changes (bugs fixed, etc.) please see the Lightroom Journal.

Lightroom 4 arrives in Creative Cloud

I’m delighted to say that Lightroom 4 is now available via Creative Cloud subscription.

If you’re a member of Creative Cloud, log into your account to download, install and start using Lightroom 4 today. If you’re not yet a member to Creative Cloud, you can get Photoshop, Lightroom, and other apps for as little as $29.99/month; here’s more info

As Photoshop PM Jeff Tranberry writes,

Lightroom coming into Creative Cloud is a good example of why we think people will really love Creative Cloud — we can add new creative tools and members just get them at no additional cost – it’s as simple as that. We’ll be adding even more great stuff to Creative Cloud over time; Lightroom is just the beginning.

If you’re new to LR4 or CS6, check out the list of free learning resources that Jeff has pulled together.

This Friday evening: Making photo books in Lightroom

6:30 PM To 8:30 PM at Adobe San Francisco, hosted by members of the LR team:

Making Photo Books in Lightroom! — SF Bay Area Lightroom User Group: This month’s meetup will be in San Francisco, and we’ll discuss the new Book module in Lightroom 4. We’ll go through the complete process of making a book in Lightroom, from start to finish. The presentation will include a description of how to use Auto Layout Presets, which are a powerful tool for quickly and easily making the book you want in as few clicks as possible.

Check out the site to RSVP and for additional details.

Join the Camera Raw/Lightroom engineering team

Camera Raw—the engine featured in both Lightroom & Photoshop—is the definitive raw-image processing pipeline for professionals. Now there’s a unique opportunity for a badass imaging engineer to join the team. Check out more details here.

[Cynically I sometimes think, “Eh, who reads this damn blog anyway?” But last time I posted something like this, genius Eric Chan saw it, and he’s the reason ACR/LR feature killer noise reduction & many other things. –J.]

Lightroom user group meeting in SJ tonight

Lightroom team members will be on hand at Adobe HQ in San Jose tonight to discuss, among other things, the new Defringe and HDR Tone Controls introduced in Lightroom 4.1.

One of the suggestions we got at our last meeting was that we provide some time for networking, in addition to the presentation itself. I think this is a fabulous idea, so how about this: bring a photo that you’ve taken that you love. You can bring it on your laptop, tablet, phone, or printed on an honest-to-goodness piece of paper. Then, while enjoying complimentary pizza prior to the presentation, share your photo with at least one other person (someone not previously known to you!) and talk about why you like it. People who choose not to bring a photo will be publicly scorned.

The meeting will be held in the ‘Park’ conference room.  If you haven’t RSVP’d more than 24 hours in advance, you’ll need to get a badge from security when you arrive.”

Photosmith 2 enhances Lightroom-iPad integration

I’m delighted to see that Photosmith has released version 2, enabling multi-image tagging, bidirectional sync with Lightroom, native Eye-Fi support, and more.

According to their site, new features of the $20 app include:

  • Wirelessly sync your unsorted backlog from Lightroom with our free plugin
  • Sort and filter your photos
  • Organize them into collections
  • Apply star ratings and color labels
  • Apply keywords and IPTC metadata individually, in groups, or with presets
  • Share highlights and rough selections to Facebook, Flickr or by e-mail
  • Support for RAW, JPG, or RAW+JPG
  • Support for 100% zoom for many cameras
  • Native support for Export and Publish Services in Adobe Lightroom
  • Directly receive from Eye-Fi cards
  • Very powerful sync options, allowing workflow customization

I can’t wait to try it out when I get home. If you’re using the app, what do you think of it?

New HTML5 gallery options for Photoshop & Lightroom

I’ve long admired the work of Felix Turner, and now he’s debuted a new HTML5 gallery called Juicebox:

Juicebox makes it incredibly easy to build beautiful image galleries that work on all devices from IE6 to iOS and Android. We offer a fully functional free version and a pro version which allows advanced customization. Check out sample galleries.

It’s available for download in both free & paid forms. You can create galleries via a free desktop app, or better yet you can export them through Lightroom & Photoshop plug-ins.

Lightroom 4.1 adds HDR toning, improved defringing

Check it out:

  • Lightroom 4.1 RC2 now includes the ability to process HDR TIFF files.  (16, 24 or 32-bit TIFF files)  This can be quite useful if you have merged multiple exposures into a single 32-bit image using Photoshop’s HDR Pro.  Using the new basic panel controls can be a very effective and straightforward method of achieving an overall balance across the tonal range.
  • Additional Color Fringing corrections have been added to Lightroom 4.1 RC2.  Please see this blog post for additional details.

Lightroom 4.1 Now Available on Adobe Labs

Lightroom 4.1 is now available as Release Candidates on Adobe Labs.  It adds support for the Canon 5D Mk III and, according to the Lightroom Journal, fixes a number of bugs:

  • Point Curve adjustments made in Lightroom 3 and before have been restored.
  • Lightroom 4 did not properly open external applications when using the “Edit In” functionality.
  • Addressed performance issues in Lightroom 4, particularly when loading GPS track logs, using a secondary monitor, and the controls within the Develop module.
  • Ability to update DNG previews and metadata for more than 100 photos has been restored.
  • This update allows for improved viewing of subfolders and stacks in folders with a large number of photos.
  • It was possible that a layout of a saved book could be lost after quitting Lightroom 4.
  • Please provide feedback on your experience with the Lightroom 4.1 Release Candidate in our feedback portal.

A new Lightroom 4 video workshop

Former Adobe evangelist George Jardine is now offering the Adobe Lightroom 4 Video Workshop, 16 new tutorials that focus on the Library workflow & digital asset management:

This all-new set of 16 video tutorials gives you over 6 hours of the very best online education available. It covers the Adobe Lightroom 4 Library and your digital photo library management from top to bottom. We start from the ground up, and guide any serious photographer—professional or passionate amateur—through the process of building an easy-to-use, but incredibly effective digital photo library. The complete series is only $24.95.

A sample video (“Collections & Virtual Copies”) is available to check out.

"What happened to Fill Light and Recovery?"

The Lightroom team has evolved the editing control set in the just-released LR4, replacing a couple of popular but sometimes problematic controls:

Recovery can result in muddy highlights, and Fill Light can lead to visible halos at high-contrast boundaries. Furthermore, it is difficult to transfer the technology behind these controls to local adjustments.

With Process Version 2012 in Lightroom 4, we have introduced a new set of Basic tone controls that overcomes these limitations and results in much higher image quality. For example, the Highlights and Shadows tools are optimized for very high contrast images, produce much smoother highlight and shadow gradations, are available as local adjustments, and minimize halo artifacts.

Check out the Lightroom Journal for more details. [Via Jan Kabili]

Hasselblad cameras will ship with Lightroom 4

Badasses unite:

Hasselblad’s Chris Russell-Fish said: “Integrating the Adobe platform with Hasselblad is a ground-breaking step… [N]ow all users can have the excellence of a Hasselblad image file married to the functionality and ease of use of Adobe Lightroom.”

Hasselblad customers who buy new medium format H4D cameras will receive Lightroom 4 software with their new camera equipment at no additional cost.”

 

Camera Raw 6.7 available on Adobe Labs

Camera Raw 6.7 (required for full compatibility between Lightroom 4.0 and Photoshop CS5) & the free DNG Converter (which can make your raw files readable by any DNG-capable app, including older versions of Photoshop & Lightroom) are available as release candidates from Adobe Labs. New cameras supported:

  • Canon EOS 1D X
  • Canon EOS 5D Mk III
  • Canon PowerShot G1 X
  • Canon PowerShot S100V
  • Fuji FinePix F505EXR
  • Fuji FinePix F605EXR
  • Fuji FinePix HS30EXR
  • Fuji FinePix HS33EXR
  • Fuji FinePix X-S1
  • Nikon D4
  • Nikon D800
  • Nikon D800E

See the Lightroom Journal for a full list of camera profiles added.

Lightroom 4 arrives (at a great new price, too)

I’m delighted to say that Lightroom 4 is now available!  Tom Hogarty writes,

With over 300,000 downloads of the Lightroom 4 public beta we’ve heard some resounding feedback that photographers would like to start using Lightroom 4 on a daily basis and migrate their previous Lightroom work to this latest version.

We’re also excited to announce new pricing for Lightroom 4: $149 for those new to Lightroom and $79 for the Upgrade and Student/Teacher editions.  (You can upgrade from any version of Lightroom to Lightroom 4)

Changes since the public beta:

  • Reverse geocoding now available in the Map Module
  • Revamped and improved auto tone in Develop based on new controls
  • Increased range of local white balance controls (temperature and tint)
  • Updated Develop presets plus added new presets for video
  • Maximum Blurb book size is now 240 pages
  • Over 800 bugs found and fixed! (Thank you Lightroom 4 beta customers!)

Check out the rest of Tom’s post for additional details about camera & profiles now supported, etc. And happy shooting!

[PS–Customer feedback I just happened to see on Prodig list: “The new way of organizing the Raw adjustment sliders is to die for… You can fix your histogram with precision like a lepidopterist pinning a butterfly to a board.” — Robert Workman. Nice!]

How to manage Lightroom assets across disks

This is one I keep failing to watch, but it sounds extremely useful (as I’m always running short of laptop HD space & am moving to an SSD):

This video (How To: Move & Archive Images and Export A Catalog) shows how to create a folder on an external drive and move your files to that drive from within Lightroom. Note that the first segment answers the question “What are the question marks on my images/folders and how do I relink files?”. If you prefer to skip this section, start the video at 4 minutes 38 seconds.

Lightroom 4 demo/Q&A and more this Tuesday

The San Jose user group meets Tuesday (pizza starting at 6:30) at Adobe HQ. [Update: A similar event is happening Tuesday in Seattle.]

First, exciting news! Lightroom 4 public beta is now available as a free download! Join Lightroom Product Manager Sharad Mangalick as he walks us through the new features in Lightroom 4 beta.

Lightroom 4 has something for those starting out, as well as more advanced users. The team has been working on new features like the geo-tagging map module, DSLR video support, photo book creation and much more.

Next, we will hear from professional photographer John Lund. John has been using Photoshop for over twenty years. He will share his work, how it has changed over the years, and, just as importantly, how it has remained the same. He will show his favorite work, share some before and after images and discuss how he gets his ideas as well as explaining his approach to creating new photographic realities.

 

Please see the invite for details & to RSVP.

 

VSCO Film for Lightroom & Camera Raw

VSCO Film promises to emulate classic film looks with minimal effort. The product “utilizes camera specific film profiles to alter the way Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw sees your RAW file.” Check it out:

Photographer Jeremy Cowart writes, “I consider myself to be a Photoshop purist. I hate all things actions/filters/presets, etc. But because I liked these guys so much, I decided to look into it more. Then I was blown away…” His post features numerous sample images produced with these tools.

Download the Lightroom 4 beta

I’m delighted to say that exactly six years after the first Lightroom public beta debuted,a preview of Lightroom 4.0 is available for download from Adobe Labs. Anyone can download and work with the beta (i.e. there’s no serial number requirement).

Feature highlights:

  • Robust video support
  • Manage images by location with the Map Module
  • Simplified basic adjustments
  • Powerful new Shadow & Highlight controls
  • Additional local adjustments including Noise Reduction and White Balance
  • Soft proofing reinvented
  • Elegant photo book creation
  • Email from directly within Lightroom
  • Publish videos directly to Facebook or Flickr
  • Enhanced DNG workflows
  • Adobe Revel (Carousel) export workflow

 

Check out Tom Hogarty’s Lightroom Journal post for many more details, and browse Julieanne Kost’s video overviews for in-depth demos.  The NAPP folks have put together a Lightroom 4 launch center, highlighting Scott Kelby’s favorite features & more, and Tom has pulled together a list of more great resources covering LR4.

 

Lightroom 3.6, Camera Raw 6.6 updates now final

Lightroom 3.6 (Mac|Win) and Camera Raw 6.6 (Mac|Win) are now available as final releases on Adobe.com and through the update mechanisms available in Photoshop CS5 and Lightroom 3. These updates include bug fixes, new camera support and new lens profiles.

New camera support in these releases:

  • Canon PowerShot S100
  • Fuji FinePix X10
  • Leica V-LUX 3
  • Nikon 1 V1
  • Nikon 1 J1
  • Panasonic DMC-GX1
  • Ricoh GR Digital IV
  • Samsung NX5
  • Samsung NX200
  • Sony NEX-7

  

In addition, the releases add support for numerous lens profiles while squashing a number of bugs. Please see the Lightroom Journal for details. [Via]

Lightroom 3.6, Camera Raw 6.6 available on Adobe Labs

Lightroom 3.6 and Camera Raw 6.6 are now available as Release Candidates on Adobe Labs.  The ‘release candidate’ label indicates that this update is well tested but would benefit from additional community testing before it is distributed automatically to all of our customers.

New camera support in these releases:

  • Canon PowerShot S100
  • Nikon 1 J1
  • Nikon 1 V1
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1
  • Samsung NX5

In addition, the releases add support for numerous lens profiles while squashing a number of bugs. Please see the Lightroom Journal for details.

Lightroom 3.5, Camera Raw 6.5 updates available

Lightroom 3.5 (Mac|Win) and Camera Raw 6.5 (Mac|Win) are now available as final releases on Adobe.com and through the update mechanisms available in Photoshop CS5 and Lightroom 3.  These updates include bug fixes, new camera support and new lens profiles. New camera support:

  • Fuji FinePix F600EXR
  • Hasselblad H4D-60
  • Leaf Aptus II 12
  • Leaf Aptus II 12R
  • Nikon Coolpix P7100
  • Olympus E-P3Olympus E-PL3
  • Olympus E-PM1Panasonic DMC-FZ
  • 150Panasonic DMC-G3
  • Panasonic DMC-GF3
  • Pentax Q
  • Phase One  IQ140
  • Phase One  IQ160
  • Phase One  IQ180
  • Phase One  P40+
  • Phase One  P65+
  • Ricoh GXR MOUNT A12
  • Sony Alpha NEX-C3
  • Sony Alpha NEX-5N
  • Sony SLT-A35
  • Sony SLT-A65
  • Sony SLT-A77
  • Hasselblad “FFF” files created by the Hasselblad Phocus software for currently supported models are also now supported. (FFF files created using the FlexColor software are not supported)

 

For a list of lens profiles added & bugs fixed, please see the Lightroom Journal post.

Lightroom: Watermark your images with sequential names/numbers

A photographer friend wrote me to say that her client has requested that she stamp each image in a shoot with a visible sequence number, making it easy for the client to request shots by name. With an assist from Lightroom PM Tom Hogarty, I can suggest the following:

  • Go into the Slideshow module.
  • Pick a template if you’d like (Tom had me choose Widescreen).
  • On the bottom toolbar press the “ABC” (“add text”) button.
  • From the adjacent popup menu, choose “Filename.”
  • Position the filename over the image as desired.
  • In the lower left corner, choose “Export PDF…” (or hold Opt/Alt to get “Export JPEG…”).
  • If for any reason you want the visible numbers to match the images’ filenames, add the following steps:
    • Choose Library->Rename.
    • Back in the Slideshow module, select a preset like “Custom Name – Sequence.” (You can choose “Edit” to get fancy with renaming tokens, but the presets will likely suffice.)

 

Lightroom 3.5, Camera Raw 6.5 available on Adobe Labs

Lightroom 3.5 and Camera Raw 6.5 are now available as Release Candidates on Adobe Labs. New camera support includes the following models:

  • Fuji FinePix F600EXR
  • Olympus E-P3
  • Olympus E-PL3
  • Olympus E-PM1
  • Panasonic DMC-G3
  • Panasonic DMC-GF3
  • Phase One IQ140
  • Phase One IQ160
  • Phase One P40+
  • Phase One P65+
  • Sony Alpha NEX-C3
  • Sony SLT-A35
  • Hasselblad “FFF” files created by the Hasselblad Phocus software for currently supported models are also now supported. (FFF files created using the FlexColor software are not supported.)

 

The updates also add support for various lenses & fix a number of bugs.  For full details see Tom Hogarty’s post on the Lightroom Journal. [Via Jan Kabili]

New Lightroom Website builder plug-in released

Matthew Campagna has released TTG Pages CE for Lightroom:

TTG Pages CE is not an image gallery. It is a website construction tool used to create a home in which your image galleries may thrive. It creates pages — Home, Services, Info, About and a Contact page with email contact form — and a self-populating Gallery Index for your image galleries.

Whether you’re building your first photo website or your hundredth, TTG Pages CE is the tool you’ve been waiting for to streamline your Lightroom-to-website workflow, and to create a website you can take pride in.

The tool is $25 from Matthew’s site.

In-depth B&W conversion video

Speaking of old friends, former Lightroom evangelist/PM George Jardine has posted a free 37-minute video that dives deeply into black & white conversion. He writes,

In this video, I start by taking you on a brief exploration of some of the various conversion techniques that we all used back before there were better controls for creating good black & white’s from raw data. And I did this because I think reviewing those tried-and-true Photoshop techniques, helps set the stage for a better understanding of black & white conversion in general.

Check out George’s site for details.

Photosmith, the Lightroom iPad companion, is now available

I’m very pleased to see that after much anticipation, Photosmith for iPad has been released. I haven’t yet had a chance to try it, but initial reactions seem enthusiastic. Rob Galbraith writes,

We’ve had the pleasure of using Photosmith during its beta period and it has already joined our list of must-have photography apps for Apple’s tablet. If you use Lightroom and own an iPad, we strongly recommend checking out Photosmith.

Tangent: I’ll kick the tires once I find my tablet’s Camera Connection Kit, which is… somewhere.  Apple must surely recognize the frailty of such a solution, and I’m waiting for them to do to it what the iPad 2’s Smart Cover did to the original’s recycled-mousepad of a cover: enable incredibly easy pairing & transfer between devices (e.g. cameras, phones, and tablets).  Hints about AirDrop in Lion make me hopeful.