Category Archives: Mobile

New Google Photos widget puts memories onto your iPhone homescreen

YouTube, the Google app, and Photos now offer options to show widgets via the new iOS 14:

To install a Google Widget, first make sure you have the Google Photos appYouTube Music app or Google app downloaded from the App Store. Then follow these steps:

  1. Press and hold  on the home screen of your iPhone or iPad
  2. Tap the plus icon on the upper left corner to open the widget gallery
  3. Search for & tap on the Google app, YouTube Music or the Google Photos app
  4. Swipe right/left to select the widget size
  5. Tap “Add Widget”
  6. Place the widget and tap “Done” at the upper right corner

Chrome for iOS improves password autofill, Face ID integration

Teamwork makes the dream work, baby:

Improvements to password filling on iOS

We recently launched Touch-to-fill for passwords on Android to prevent phishing attacks. To improve security on iOS too, we’re introducing a biometric authentication step before autofilling passwords. On iOS, you’ll now be able to authenticate using Face ID, Touch ID, or your phone passcode. Additionally, Chrome Password Manager allows you to autofill saved passwords into iOS apps or browsers if you enable Chrome autofill in Settings.

ML Kit gets pose detection

This is kinda inside-baseball, but I’m really happy that friends from my previous team will now have their work distributed on hundreds of millions, if not billions, of devices:

[A] face contours model — which can detect over 100 points in and around a user’s face and overlay masks and beautification elements atop them — has been added to the list of APIs shipped through Google Play Services…

Lastly, two new APIs are now available as part of the ML Kit early access program: entity extraction and pose detection… Pose detection supports 33 skeletal points like hands and feet tracking.

Let’s see what rad stuff the world can build with these foundational components. Here’s an example of folks putting an earlier version to use, and you can find a ton more in my Body Tracking category:

[Via]

Adobe releases Photoshop Camera

After being announced last fall, it’s free to download for iOS & Android.

TBH I’m a little nonplussed about the specific effects shown here, but I remain intrigued by the idea of a highly accessible, results-oriented app that could also generate layered imagery for further tweaking in Photoshop and other more flexible tools.

As for the rationale, PetaPixel notes,

The main goal of apps like this might simply be to introduce more people to the Adobe ecosystem. Adobe CTO Abhay Parasnis said as much in an interview with The Verge, in which he calls Photoshop Camera “the next one in that journey for us.” Photoshop Camera could act as the “gateway drug” to a Creative Cloud subscription for anybody who discovers a dormant love of photo editing.

Action Blocks make tasks more accessible for those with cognitive impairments

I’ve long joked-not-joked that I want better parental controls on devices, not so that I can control my kids but so that I can help my parents. How great would it be to be able to configure something like this, then push it to the devices of those who need it (parents, kids, etc.)?

Cool multicolor painting tools arrive in Adobe Fresco

I’ve always been part of that weird little slice of the Adobe user population that gets really hyped about offbeat painting tools—from stretching vectors along splines & spraying out fish in Illustrator (yes, they’re both in your copy right now; no, you’ve never used them), to painting with slick features that got pulled from Photoshop before release & somehow have never returned. I still wish we’d been able to shoehorn GPU-powered watercolor into Photoshop’s, er, venerable compositing engine, but so it goes. (A 15-year-old demo still lives at one of my best URLs ever, jnack.com/BlowingYourMindClearOutYourAss )

In any event, the Adobe Fresco team has just unveiled a raft of new features, including some trippy multicolor painting capabilities. Check it out:

Quick Comparison: Pixel 4 vs. iPhone 11 at Night

[Please note: I don’t work on the Pixel team, and these opinions are just those of a guy with a couple of phones in hand, literally shooting in the dark.]

In Yosemite Valley on Friday night, I did some quick & unscientific but illuminating (oh jeez) tests shooting with a Pixel 4 & iPhone 11 Pro Max. I’d had fleeting notions of trying some proper astrophotography (side note: see these great tips from Pixel engineer & ILM vet Florian Kainz), but between the moon & the clouds, I couldn’t see a ton of stars. Therefore I mostly held up both phones, pressed the shutter button, and held my breath.

Check out the results in this album. You can see which camera produced which images by tapping each image, then tapping the little comment icon. I haven’t applied any adjustments.

Overall I’m amazed at what both devices can produce, but overall I preferred the Pixel’s interpretations. They were darker, but truer to what my eyes perceived, and very unlike the otherworldly, day-for-night iPhone renderings (which persisted despite a few attempts I made to set focus, then drag down the exposure before shooting).

Check out the results, judge for yourself, and let me know what you think.

UntitledImage

Oh, and for a much more eye-popping Pixel 4 result, check out this post from Adobe’s Russell Brown: