Ballet Rotoscope

This short film from Masahiko Sato + EUPHRATES is poetry in motion:

[B]y extracting the movement of a dancing ballerina, we created a animation of locus drawn in the air, and dancing geometric figures, composed with a documentary picture. The geometric figures were created by connecting the movement of ballerina’s joints by using algorithm of computer geometry(such as “convex hull”,and “Delaunay diagram”). Our aim was to represent a complete new type of beauty, by showing the interaction of abstract animation with realistic movements and documentary film.

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Illustration: A charming street-art ad from Coke

I’ve been getting a kick out of this spot running during the Olympics:

The minute-long spot features three animated graffiti characters stealthily shifting off a wall and, unseen by passersby distracted by drinking Coca-Cola, climb their way up skyscrapers towards their destination: a print ad of three bottles of Coca-Cola. The trio then enjoy the drinks together on the side of a water tower.

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[YouTube]

Mesmerizing drone shots from inside a fireworks cloud

Happy Chinese New Year from above Yunnan, China:

The intriguing reversal of footage reminds me of this beautifully sad passage from Slaughterhouse Five:

The formation flew backwards over a German city that was in flames. The bombers opened their bomb bay doors, exerted a miraculous magnetism which shrunk the fires, gathered them into cylindrical steel containers , and lifted the containers into the bellies of the planes. The containers were stored neatly in racks. The Germans below had miraculous devices of their own, which were long steel tubes. They used them to suck more fragments from the crewmen and planes. But there were still a few wounded Americans though and some of the bombers were in bad repair. Over France though, German fighters came up again, made everything and everybody as good as new.

When the bombers got back to their base, the steel cylinders were taken from the racks and shipped back to the United States of America, where factories were operating night and day, dismantling the cylinders, separating the dangerous contents into minerals. Touchingly, it was mainly women who did this work. The minerals were then shipped to specialists in remote areas. It was their business to put them into the ground, to hide them cleverly, so they would never hurt anybody ever again.

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Google releases data to help improve HDR imaging

The smart folks responsible for HDR+ on the Pixel 2 are sharing a big dataset in order to help other developers create better high-dynamic-range imagery:

Today we’re pleased to announce the public release of an archive of image bursts to the research community. This provides a way for others to compare their methods to the results of Google’s HDR+ software running on the same input images. This dataset consists of 3,640 bursts of full-resolution raw images, made up of 28,461 individual images, along with HDR+ intermediate and final results for comparison.

[O]ur hope is that a shared dataset will enable the community to concentrate on comparing results. This approach is intrinsically more efficient than expecting researchers to configure and run competing techniques themselves, or to implement them from scratch if the code is proprietary. 

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Rather fascinating: “What ‘Super Mario’ Looks Like at 380,000fps”

This is my kind of nerdery:

Old TVs render an image by actually drawing the entire frame from top to bottom at speeds so fast the human eye can’t detect it, but Free and Gruchy’s cameras can. Mario is almost indistinguishable at 380,000 FPS, but it’s amazing to watch beams of light shoot across a screen in slow motion, slowly building the Mushroom Kingdom we all know and love.

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[YouTube] [Via]