Monthly Archives: November 2020

Chrome is reducing memory usage, adding tab search, and more

As always I’m low-key embarrassed to find this stuff exciting, but ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ The team writes,

Chrome now prioritizes your active tabs vs. everything that’s open—reducing CPU usage by up to 5x and extending battery life by up to 1.25 hours (based on our internal benchmarks).

Plus:

You can pin tabs (for those go-to pages), send tabs to your other devices and even group tabs in Chrome. This month we’re adding tab search to the toolbox.

You’ll now be able to see a list of your open tabs—regardless of the window they’re in—then quickly type to find the one you need. It’s search … for your tabs! The feature is coming first to Chromebooks, then to other desktop platforms soon.

Search has rolled out on Chrome OS & is due to come to other platforms soon.

Oh, and the “omnibox” (URL/search/dessert topping/floor wax) is learning to do new things you type in. Initial actions:

  • Clear Browsing Data – type ‘delete history’, ‘clear cache ‘ or ‘wipe cookies’
  • Manage Payment Methods – type ‘edit credit card’ or ‘update card info’
  • Open Incognito Window – type ‘launch incognito mode‘ or ‘incognito’
  • Manage Passwords – type ‘edit passwords’ or ‘update credentials’
  • Update Chrome – type ‘update browser’ or ‘update google chrome’
  • Translate Page – type ‘ translate this’ or ‘ translate this page’

Animation: Cutout LeBron flies in the real world

Artist Rudy Willingham has developed a clever, laborious way of turning video frames into physical cutouts & then overlaying them on interesting backgrounds. Check it out:

 

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

A post shared by Rudy Willingham (@rudy_willingham)

I think I like this set even more:

 

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

A post shared by Rudy Willingham (@rudy_willingham)

[Via]

Celebrate Diwali through Google AR

Visit this page in your mobile browser, or just take a peek (below) at the project, brought to you by the Google Arts & Culture Lab:

Some context for folks like me, who didn’t grow up with a connection to Indian traditions:

Diwali is the Indian festival of lights, usually lasting five days and celebrated during the Hindu Lunisolar month Kartika. One of the most popular festivals of Hinduism, Diwali symbolizes the spiritual “victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance”.