Monthly Archives: January 2020

Premiere Pro reveals collaborative Productions feature

The other PM in our family (“Hollywood” Nack 💃🏻😌) & her team have been busy:

[T]he new Productions feature set for Premiere Pro was designed from the ground up with input from top filmmakers and Hollywood editorial teams. Early versions of the underlying technology were battle-tested on recent films such as “Terminator: Dark Fate” and “Dolemite is My Name.” Special builds of Premiere Pro with Productions are being used now in editorial on films like David Fincher’s “MANK.” […]

Editorial teams can organize feature film workflows by reels and scenes. Episodic content creators can group their shows by season and agencies can allocate a Production to each client, for easy access to existing assets. You control your content: Productions use shared local storage and can be used without an internet connection.

Check out a quick tour:

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[YouTube] [Via]

Adobe XD introduces Content-Aware Layout

Long, long have I awaited thee…

The team writes,

Content-Aware Layout understands the relationships between layers on your canvas and automatically adjusts these layers as your designs change. In this initial release, Content-Aware Layout lets you control the padding values of a group and maintain those values as the group’s layers change, such as when you’re adding a new layer to the group or editing a text layer… You can learn about Content-Aware Layout in our announcement post and explore free tutorials and demo files on Let’s XD.

 

[YouTube]

“Loretta,” Google’s touching Super Bowl ad

“A man reminisces about the love of his life with a little help from Google.” 😢😌

If you’d like to try some of these things for yourself:

First you’ll need the Google Assistant.

00:12 “Show me photos of me and Loretta”
To use the Assistant to pull up photos, make sure you and your favorite people are tagged in your Google Photos. Then just say, “Hey Google, show me photos of me and [their name]”

00:21 “Remember, Loretta hated my mustache.”
To try this one, just say, “Hey Google, remember…” and then whatever you’d like the Assistant to help you recall later. Like “Hey Google, remember Dad’s shoe size is 8 and half” or “remember Maria loves lilies.” Then, to see everything you’ve asked the Assistant to remember, just say, “Hey Google, what did I tell you to remember?”

00:39 “Show me photos from our anniversary”
To see photos from a wedding, anniversary, birthday, or graduation, you’ll need a Google Photos account, and you’ll also need to tell your Assistant the specific date. Just say something like, “Hey Google, remember my anniversary is May 18th” or “remember Mark’s birthday is March 30th.” Then you can use that information in many ways, like “Hey Google, show me photos from our anniversary” or “Hey Google, remind me to buy flowers on Mark’s birthday.”

00:51 “Play our favorite movie.”
First, tell your Google Assistant what your favorite movie is by saying, “Hey Google, our favorite movie is Casablanca.” Once you’ve purchased your favorite movie on Google Play Movies or YouTube, all you have to say is, “Hey Google, play our favorite movie” and the movie will start playing.

[YouTube]

“Fishception!”

“It’s like a big fish made out of fish,” my 10yo son Henry just noted, “Fishception!”

Kottke, who says “Scary Sea Monster Really Just Hundreds of Tiny Fish in a Trench Coat,” notes:

“Try rewatching the video, picking one fish and following it the entire time. Then pick another fish and watch the video again. The juvenile striped eel catfish seem to cycle through positions within the school as the entire swarm moves forward.”

Like riders in a peleton, each taking their turn braving danger at the front.

[YouTube]

“Ghost Box”: An audio/sculptural mashup

Steve Parker’s brass audio sculptures are a delightfully weird melange:

Activated by touch, “Ghost Box” plays randomized audio segments on a loop, including the ticks of Morse Code, the chorus of spirituals, and the blows of the shofar and Iron Age Celtic carnyx. Each time someone makes contact with a part of the wall sculpture, a new noise emits.

The artists writes,

The Ghost Army was an Allied Army tactical deception unit during World War II. Their mission was to impersonate other Allied Army units to deceive the enemy. From a few weeks before D-Day, when they landed in France, until the end of the war, they put on a “traveling road show” utilizing inflatable tanks, sound trucks, fake radio transmissions, scripts, and sound projections. The unit was an incubator for many young artists who went on to have a major impact on the post-war US, including Ellsworth Kelly, Bill Blass, and Arthur Singer.

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Visually inspecting trains at high speed

It’s pretty OT for my blog, I know, but as someone who’s been working in computer vision for the last couple of years, I find it interesting to see how others are applying these techniques.

Equipped with ultra-high definition cameras and high-powered illumination, the [Train Inspection Portal (TIP)] produces 360° scans of railcars passing through the portal at track speed. Advanced machine vision technology and software algorithms identify defects and automatically flag cars for repair.

[Vimeo]

A few smart career tweets

I’m now thinking about this constantly:

This too:

And yeah, ¬”Satisfaction, but feeling of uselessness…”