Monthly Archives: July 2013

"Duct Tape Surfing"

Hey, mind if I duct-tape your mom to my back and go surfing? Crazy, inspiring, beautiful stuff. Via Kottke:

Pascale Honore enjoyed watching her sons surf but couldn’t participate because she’s been a paraplegic for the past 18 years. But then Tyron Swan, a friend of her sons, duct taped her to his back and took her out on his board.

[Vimeo]

A trippy Tokyo timelapse

Gorgeous work from Japanese photographer “DarwinFish105“:

According to dvice, the video was shot “using a [Panasonic DMC-GH3] in continuous-shot mode at 1-second shutter speed. The artist then took the footage into Adobe Premiere and applied mirroring and other effects that resulted in visuals that are rooted in reality, yet appear incredibly psychedelic.”

[Vimeo] [Via Stuart DeSpain]

Time lapse: A love letter to SF fog

Simon Christen calls his new film Adrift “a love letter to the fog of the San Francisco Bay Area,” writing,

I chased it for over two years to capture the magical interaction between the soft mist, the ridges of the California coast and the iconic Golden Gate Bridge. This is where “Adrift” was born.
If you like this short film, please consider using the tipping jar, proceeds will go towards the next project.


[Vimeo] [Via Mischa McLachlan]

No words

On the NY Times, Nick Bilton talks about photographs becoming a ubiquitous, disposable form of communication:

Photos, once slices of a moment in the past — sunsets, meetings with friends, the family vacation — are fast becoming an entirely new type of dialogue. The cutting-edge crowd is learning that communicating with a simple image, be it a picture of what’s for dinner or a street sign that slyly indicates to a friend, “Hey, I’m waiting for you,” is easier than bothering with words, even in a world of hyper-abbreviated Twitter posts and texts.

Apparently text messaging is in (slight) decline, while SnapChat (y’know, self-destructing junk shots for the kids) is reputedly worth $800+ million. This is the part where Old Man Nack officially feels he has no idea what’s going on.
There’s got to be some great Orwell quote about losing the language to make sense of experiences, but, eh, who wants to read all that?
Elsewhere Dave Pell muses about how imaging can separate us from experiences:

We’ve ceded many of our remembering duties (birthdays, schedules, phone numbers, directions) to a hard drive in the cloud. And to a large extent, we’ve now handed over our memories of experiences to digital cameras. […]
We no longer take any time to create an internal memory of an event or an experience before seeing, filtering, and sharing a digital version of it. We remember the photo, not the moment.

In a world of social media, we can all exist in a droll, above-it-all sugary crust (like Seinfeld talking about how in a cab, everything on the other side of the plexiglass, no matter how dangerous, is amusing & unreal). It’s a good time to remember that Facebook likes, like design, won’t save the world