Monthly Archives: December 2006

Lightroom Podcast #23: Jay Maisel & Richard Benson

Adobe Pro Photography Evangelist George Jardine is kicking his podcasting game up a notch, now adding video content. On Monday Oct. 30th George visited Richard Benson’s home in Newport, Rhode Island, where he spoke with Richard and Jay Maisel about Richard’s latest work with inkjet printers. George writes,

This “video” podcast includes photos taken by Richard, as well as photos documenting the occasion taken by both myself and by Thomas Palmer. It can be viewed by downloading it directly into iTunes (if you are accessing it by subscribing via the Music Store), or by copying it into iTunes on either a Mac or a PC (if you’ve downloaded it from my iDisk). Once copied into iTunes, it can be transferred to a Video iPod, and viewed that way as well. When viewing it on an iPod, be sure to access the video from the Video menu (then “Movies” or “Video Podcasts”…. depending upon how you downloaded it), and NOT from the Music menu. If you access it from the Music menu, you will not see the photographs.

Dreamweaver will chop off your hand…

…if you’re on the DW team and break their build, that is! Engineering and QE would be nowhere without a little hazing, and it seems that each team has its own rituals for dealing with folks who make code changes that screw up the project (i.e., break the daily product build). Unfortunate Photoshop engineers are sometimes known to have a stuffed Space Monkey hanging, albatross-like, from their office doors. The Dreamweaver team is sharper edged, though, and in this video from team member Dominic Sagolla, we see what happens to codebreakers in their world (in this case, newly minted PM Kenneth Berger).

Excellent Worth1000 Photoshoppery

  • As kid I loved Wacky Packages, the little 70’s-era goofs on popular brands of the times.  Now the crew at Worth1000.com grabs that baton, mashing up classics with commerce in these Fine Art Ads. [Via]
  • Along somewhat similar lines, Kasper Hauser’s Sky Maul is a pretty darn funny compendium of "Happy Crap You Can Buy from a Plane." [Via]
  • I love this take on Escher as a child–hilarious and kind of heartbreaking all at once.  ("Don’t let the bastards grind you down…")
  • Elsewhere the site features good critter-hacking: Evolution Gone Wild, and some rather excellent Cybernetic Animals.
  • It’s deeply, deeply nasty–to the point where I didn’t scroll too far–but the "That’s Not Turkey!" gallery may make you grateful for what you didn’t eat on Thanksgiving.
  • Oh, and if that’s not quite disturbing enough, how about a meat chess board, or meat body suit? Rare is the new black, I’m told.

Photoshop & Macs: The new shuffleboard?

This week C|NET published findings from MetaFacts indicating that "nearly half of Mac owners are 55 and older–almost double the share for average home PC users."  Apple disputes this claim, though I’d take it as a compliment that my tools can be used by a generation not raised by Grand Theft Auto. 

As it happens, the registered base* of Photoshop customers has skewed older in recent years, due to the exploding popularity of digital photography.  The same folks who in previous generations might’ve sprung for a home darkroom now tend to buy a really nice digital SLR, computer, and the best software to go with it.  These trends prompted my colleague Ashley to quip, "Photoshop & Macs: The new shuffleboard?"

This demographic trend has some practical implications. Most obviously, we need to make a user interface that’s easy to navigate with older eyes.  Given the 20- and 30-something demographics of many visual designers, this isn’t always easy to remember, but we’re working on it.  The emergence of scalable, resolution-independent will be essential here, and in the meantime Photoshop CS2 added the ability to adjust the font size of the interface (a small thing, literally, but a step in the right direction).

*Note: This of course way undercounts all the five-finger-discounting little l33t-speak haxxor-kiddies. (“im in ur base, stealin ur ‘Shop…”)

Photoshop & Macs: The new shuffleboard?

This week C|NET published findings from MetaFacts indicating that "nearly half of Mac owners are 55 and older–almost double the share for average home PC users."  Apple disputes this claim, though I’d take it as a compliment that my tools can be used by a generation not raised by Grand Theft Auto. 

As it happens, the registered base* of Photoshop customers has skewed older in recent years, due to the exploding popularity of digital photography.  The same folks who in previous generations might’ve sprung for a home darkroom now tend to buy a really nice digital SLR, computer, and the best software to go with it.  These trends prompted my colleague Ashley to quip, "Photoshop & Macs: The new shuffleboard?"

This demographic trend has some practical implications. Most obviously, we need to make a user interface that’s easy to navigate with older eyes.  Given the 20- and 30-something demographics of many visual designers, this isn’t always easy to remember, but we’re working on it.  The emergence of scalable, resolution-independent will be essential here, and in the meantime Photoshop CS2 added the ability to adjust the font size of the interface (a small thing, literally, but a step in the right direction).

*Note: This of course way undercounts all the five-finger-discounting little l33t-speak haxxor-kiddies. (“im in ur base, stealin ur ‘Shop…”)

Sweet Flash+After Effects example

The crew at WDDG has declared "Technological & Creative Warfare" on lame online portforlios, kicking out the retro jams with their new company site.  Besides being a great Flash showcase, it represents a great integration of Flash & After Effects.  Company founder James Baker says he was inspired by seeing Dr. Woohoo’s AE->Flash tools, which he then used to link the apps.  He writes, "The jitter is motion-captured from some old footage and looped throughout the site.  I threw a 2-pixel blur on it and a loop of crap over the top, and suddenly crappy JPEGs looked like newsreel footage." And of course the site makes heavy use of color-treated & modified film stock, exported as Flash video (FLV).  Killer all around. [Update: Drew has interviewed James & shares more info about the project.]

(Oh, and don’t forget to take a look behind the scenes at their advanced design process.)